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Why Do Cats Purr When They Are Dying – The Truth

Why Do Cats Purr When They Are Dying – The Truth

Why do cats purr when they are dying? It is a common belief that cats purr when they are dying as a way to let their human caregivers know that they are there and that they are not alone. For any cat owner, it is not easy to accept the fact that their beloved cat is dying, but as it is considered to be one of the family members, sooner or later, we will all face the same thing, we’ll need to say goodbye to our furry companion.

While it is true that cats may purr, for this reason, it is important to note that every cat is different and that cats may display a variety of behaviors when they are approaching the end of their lives.

In this article, we will explore the possible reasons why cats may purr when they are dying and what you can do to comfort and support your feline friend during this difficult time.

Why Do Cats Purr When They Are Dying?

Sad sick young gray cat lies on a white fluffy blanket

There are a few theories as to why cats may purr when they are dying. One possibility is that purring is a way for cats to comfort themselves when they are feeling distressed or in pain. Purring is a low-frequency vibration that can have a calming effect on both cats and pet parents, and it may help to reduce stress and promote feelings of well-being.

Another possibility is that cats purr when they are dying as a way to communicate with their human caregivers. Cats are known for their strong bond with their caregivers, and it is possible that a cat may purr as a way to let its favorite human know that it is there and that it needs comfort and support.

It is also possible that a cat’s purring when it is dying is simply a reflexive response to its physical state. Cats may purr when they are in a relaxed state, and this behavior could continue even when the cat is approaching the end of its life. You should always observe body language.

It is important to note that every cat is different and that cats may display a variety of behaviors when they are approaching the end of their lives. If you are concerned about your cat’s health or behavior, it is always a good idea to consult with a veterinarian.

RELATED: Why Is My Cat Purring Constantly?

Will A Dying Cat Still Purr?

Sick cat medicines for sick pills spilling out of bottle

There are many possible behaviors that a dying cat may exhibit, as every cat is different and may respond differently to the end of their life. Cats will purr at the end of their lives, even if they’re dying from old age in their last days. You’ll definitely notice some behavioral changes with old cats, senior cats, and adult cats.

Some common behaviors that a dying cat may exhibit include:

Loss of appetite: A cat that is approaching the end of its life may lose its appetite and may stop eating or drinking altogether, won’t be excited when it’s mealtime, and meow near the food bowl.

Changes in activity level: A dying cat may become less active and may sleep more than usual. Alternatively, a cat may become restless or agitated.

Changes in grooming habits: A cat that is no longer able to groom itself due to weakness or discomfort may become unkempt.

Changes in bathroom habits: Sick cats will fail to use the litter box, leaving a mess.

Changes in vocalization: A cat may become more vocal or may become quiet and withdrawn.

Changes in breathing: A dying cat may experience changes in its breathing, such as shallow or labored breathing.

Changes in behavior: A cat may become more affectionate or may become more isolated and withdrawn; the cat may start cuddling more or avoiding the owner.

What Do Cats Do Right Before They Die?

Sad cat. He sits and rests her head on a wooden beam.

Cats can exhibit a number of different behaviors before they die, and it is often difficult to predict how an individual cat will behave. Some cats may become more affectionate and clingy with their loved ones, while others may become more distant and aloof.

Some cats may lose their appetite and become lethargic, while others may continue to eat and be active until close to the end of their lives. It is also common for cats to seek out a quiet, secluded place to die, such as under a bed or in a closet. It is noticed that they purr more in their final days, even though purring is always connected to happy cats.

It is important to provide your cat with love, comfort, and any necessary medical care during this time and to try to make them as comfortable as possible.

If you have any concerns about your cat’s health or behavior, it is always a good idea to consult with a veterinarian or palliative care (end-of-life care), so they can help you and see in what state exactly your cat is.

1. Seek Solitude

cat in a harbour

It is common for cats to seek out a quiet, secluded place to rest and spend time alone. This behavior is often referred to as “solitude-seeking” and is a normal part of a cat’s behavior. Cats are naturally independent animals and often enjoy having their own space where they can retreat to rest or sleep.

If your cat is seeking solitude more frequently or for longer periods of time than usual, it could be a sign that they are not feeling well or is experiencing some stress or anxiety. It is always a good idea to pay attention to your cat’s behavior and consult with a veterinarian if you have any concerns about your cat’s health or well-being.

It is also important to provide your cat with plenty of opportunities to retreat to a quiet, secluded place where they can rest and relax. This could be a cozy bed in a quiet room, a window perch with a view, or a designated spot in a closet or under a bed. By providing your cat with their own space, you can help them feel more comfortable and secure in their environment.

2. Show Signs Of Deterioration

A sick cat may appear thin or gaunt, and their fur may appear dull and unkempt. They may also have a dull or sunken appearance in their eyes, and they may be lethargic and inactive, avoiding the litter box, making messes, not eating and drinking water, not observant as before, and so on.

3. Seek Comfort

In their final days, some cats will isolate themselves while others will try to be near their loved ones as much as possible. They will also purr as a coping mechanism since it is proven that it strengthens the cat’s muscles and releases endorphins that will help her deal with pain.

4. Taking It Easy

Dying cats will have less energy, and they will often just lie down and sleep all day as they are physically weakened. If the case is severe, they even have trouble walking, getting up, or climbing the litter box.

What Are The Signs That Your Cat Is Dying?

cat refusing to eat dry food

These are some of the signs that indicate that your cat is nearly at the end of its life: 

1. Loss of appetite: Cats who are close to death may lose their appetite and stop eating or drinking.

2. Weight loss: This can be a result of the cat’s decreased appetite and can also be a sign that the cat is close to death.

3. Increased lethargy: Cats who are close to death may become more inactive and sleep more.

4. Changes in behavior: Cats may become more affectionate and clingy, or they may become more distant and aloof as they near the end of their lives.

5. Changes in appearance: Cats who are close to death may appear gaunt or thin, and their fur may appear dull and unkempt.

6. Difficulty breathing: Cats may have labored breathing or may pant excessively as they near the end of their lives.

7. Decreased body temperature: Normal body temperature for a cat is around 101-102.5 degrees Fahrenheit. If your cat’s body temperature falls below this range, it may be a cause for concern.

If you notice any of these signs in your cat, it is important to consult with a veterinarian as soon as possible. They can help determine the best course of action and provide your cat with any necessary medical care.

In Conclusion

sad woman cuddling her cat

There is no definitive answer as to why do cats purr when they are dying. Cats can purr for a variety of reasons, including as a sign of contentment, communicate their needs, or as a way to soothe themselves. It is possible that a cat may purr when they are dying as a way to cope with the pain or discomfort they are experiencing.

It is also possible that a cat may purr when they are dying as a way to communicate with its humans. Cats have a strong bond with their caregivers and may purr as a way to seek comfort and reassurance.

Ultimately, the reason why a cat may purr when they are dying will depend on the individual cat and its unique circumstances. If you have concerns about your cat’s behavior or well-being, it is always a good idea to consult with a veterinarian. They can provide you with guidance and recommendations based on your cat’s specific needs and condition.

Deciding to euthanize a beloved pet can be a very difficult and emotional decision. It is important to consider your pet’s quality of life, their current and future medical needs, and the impact that their condition is having on your family.

Suppose you are considering euthanasia for your pet. In that case, it is important to consult with a veterinarian who can provide you with guidance and recommendations. They can help you understand the options available to you and can answer any questions you may have about the euthanasia process.

It can be helpful to discuss your feelings and concerns with loved ones and to seek support from friends, family, or a professional counselor if needed. It is also important to give yourself time to process your feelings and make a decision that is best for you and your pet.

Euthanasia can be a humane and compassionate option when a pet is suffering from a terminal illness or is experiencing chronic pain that cannot be managed effectively. It is a personal decision, and there is no right or wrong answer. It is important to do what you feel is best for your pet and your family.

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